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Incontinence

One of the things you rarely hear mentioned in the soft cooing world of pregnancy and baby talk, is the heavy price that most women pay for the joys of having children - it makes them incontinent.

Well, lets face it, you rarely hear incontinence mentioned in any part of the world outside the urology clinic. But being unable to hold or control the flow of urine is a very common complication of giving birth.
A small percentage of women find themselves in an even worse nightmare - they lose control of their bowels too.

Fortunately, for most, it is no more than just a temporary problem that will go away after time usually a few weeks after giving birth, the scars are healed, and all the muscles in the area have regained their normal tone. But childbirth is just the first of several onslaughts which make women particularly vulnerable to urinary incontinence (it's more than twice as common in women than men).

Your body normally relies on a sophisticated system, which combines nervous control (from both the brain and bladder) with structural design, to make passing urine a subtle subconscious action.
There are several ways in which this control can be upset. For example, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, Parkinson's disease, brain tumors, and pelvic surgery, can all harm bladder nerves or muscles. But childbirth remains one of the main risk factors.

One of the most controversial childbirth factors is whether the risk of urinary incontinence is increased by an episiotomy (a cut made in the tissues of the birth canal to allow easier passage of the baby). The latest evidence seems to suggest that episiotomies do not significantly increase the risk of urinary incontinence.

External factors can also affect bladder control. For example, many medicines can interfere with the function of the urinary tract.
There are several types of urinary incontinence in both men and woman old and young.
Because the control of urine flow involves several elements, there are a variety of ways it can go wrong. Six different types of urinary incontinence are recognized - stress, urge, mixed, neurogenic, overflow and post-prostatectomy incontinence. The treatment you need will depend on which type of incontinence you have.

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